Thursday, November 02, 2006

Enough About Corn

I think all the sex talk got me so flustered that I forgot to deliver on my promise to Carol…I had promised to give her info on the materials used in kitchen...So here’s my resource info for Carol (and anyone else who might be interested).

Tile:

The tile is your standard 3x6 subway tile. The manufacturer of the tile is B & W Tile. We purchased the tile from our friend who owns Tile and Stone in San Rafael…(if you ever want to see some lovely eye candy you should check out the show room…)

http://www.bwtile.com/

Cabinets:

The cabinets are somewhat of a long story—because of the limitations in the room (fixed windows, chimney, wall openings, etc.) it became apparent that we would need custom-sized cabinets to make things fit properly. After trying to get bids from local cabinet makers—who failed to return calls and return bids, I decided to go in a different direction…And I'm so glad I did.

Instead of having the cabinets built locally, I decided to purchase “Ready-To-Assemble” cabinets from Scherr’s Cabinets and Doors. Let me just say that working with Leon Scherr was a pleasure—he was extremely helpful in making suggestions in the design—and wasn’t bothered by the fact that I would constantly make changes to the plans and send them back (Note: these changes were because I was changing my mind, not because the plans were wrong). Leon went through about five sets of plans before I ordered…He was extremely patient throughout the process.

Almost every cabinet is a non-standard size—which is no problem for Scherr’s since they built each cabinet to order. You can specify the type of wood and the finish…all the drawers are dovetail construction.

Because the cabinets are ready to assemble, the cost is considerably lower than other cabinets—but the materials are generally better. Putting the cabinets together was relatively easy…and because we saved considerable money on the construction, we opted to upgrade the drawers and inserts with “Blum-Motion” slides—where the door shuts itself at a certain point. If you have some basic construction skills, using a rubber mallet and screw driver, you easily put the cabinets together. The difficult part is hanging the cabinets---get some help with this one…and check out a book on installing cabinets.

http://www.scherrs.com/


Hardware:

The hardware came from House of Antique Hardware (They have great hinges too at reasonable prices).

http://houseofantiquehardware.com/


Sinks and Faucets:

The Sinks are Shaws Fireclay from Rohl and the Faucets are Perrin and Rowe and Country Collection from Rohl.

http://www.rohlhome.com/


Countertops

You can get a complete description of the countertops along with a link here.


So hopefully this helps Carol—and thanks for the nice comments.

5 Comments:

Anonymous Carol said...

Thank you so much for answering my questions. Your kitchen is what I hope to have some day. Well done!

9:31 PM  
Blogger Dulcie said...

I just discoverd your blog, and I wanted to comment that your kitchen is gorgeous! Really fabulous.

9:00 AM  
Blogger Dulcie said...

Oops, normally I can spell. I swear.

9:01 AM  
Blogger Craig said...

Great points. That, my friend, is a really important point. Unless you’re a contractor, it’s hard to make sure you don’t get ripped off when you bring in a remodeler to fix up your home. What do you do if you’re cost conscious about a remodeling project, but don’t know what to do?One great way to get pricing on projects like this is to submit your project inquiry into one of the companies that helps match you with qualified remodeling contractors. For example, at Remodeling In Town.com you can submit your project info for free, and then lots of contractors can see the project. They have this technology that makes sure the contractors who can actually do your job can then contact you to give you an estimate. I think it’s pretty cool cuz you can save money once you get a bunch of quotes, ya know?

1:06 AM  
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3:47 PM  

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